International Women’s Day Strike is a Disservice to Feminism

The ambiguous and angry Women’s March is further displaying the diminishing marginal returns of today’s “feminism,” by their International Women’s Day strike by encouraging women to not work or shop on Wednesday.

As an unmarried, Ivy League educated, woman raised in Red State America, on paper these strikers allegedly want voters like me — yet I’m left shaking my head at their antics. These “feminists” lost to President Trump because they couldn’t reach women like me. If modern feminism means strutting around dressed like fallopian tubes and blaming men when the strutting fails, count me out.

These supposedly serious strikers, who are bringing back their pink hats, are boycotting “Fake smiles, Flirting, Makeup, Laundry, Shaving.” Yet it’s difficult to see how adopting poor hygiene and manners wins friends for anyone of either sex.

These supposedly serious strikers, who are bringing back their pink hats, are boycotting “Fake smiles, Flirting, Makeup, Laundry, Shaving.”

Memo to strikers, based on tactics from the January Women’s March: dressing up like a giant vagina is probably the least-effective means of getting a Wall Street firm to hire you or venture capital firm to invest in your tech business.

These mad pink hatters who plead for tolerance even as they marginalize and silence pro-life feminists, have learned nothing from President Trump’s victory. No doubt there is much to honor about the suffragettes who fought for women’s access to voting, schooling and employment. Yet today, many of today’s feminists seem to ignore the concept of diminishing marginal returns; while women increased their share of bachelor’s degrees since the 1950s, the nation’s roughly 3-to-1 ratio of male to female economics majors hasn’t changed in 20 years.

Pressured by the high priestesses of feminism, they’re too busy studying the economically useless areas of “intersectionality” (e.g., divisive identity politics anathema to the colorblind dream of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.), and “body positivity” (e.g. the anti-science mythology that encouraging women to eat endless Big Macs creates no risk of premature death). If that’s modern feminism, count me out again.

The strikers’ demands are partisan and their optics grotesque; a not-so-thinly-disguised, anti-President Trump coalition of liberals

The strikers’ demands are partisan and their optics grotesque; a not-so-thinly-disguised, anti-President Trump coalition of liberals, the strikers are demanding, among other things, “a $15 minimum wage for all workers, no exceptions” (e.g. they want young, black and brown workers disproportionately fired or replaced by machines), “National Health Care for all” (e.g. socialized medicine roundly rejected by Americans in multiple state and national elections as Obamacare implodes), “reproductive freedom, full access, and no coercion” (e.g. taxpayer-funded, abortion-on-demand, despite the rise of pro-life Republicans and Gallup data showing a steady 70 percent of Americans since 1975 wanting restrictions on abortions).

Certainly Trump said offensive things about women, including his own daughter. But American voters adjudicated those words, and candidate Trump apologized for them. Ivanka Trump is a strong supporter of her father — she sees his words as far less wrong than the sexually predatory actions of Bill Clinton and his wife, who ostracized her husband’s victims.

The strikers demand “equal pay for equal work,” a lazy catchphrase for the misleading trope propagated by liberals from Barack Obama to Hillary Clinton of women earning just “77 cents on the dollar” compared to men.

Strikers can click their red slippers in the movies, but no amount of magical thinking under pink knit hats can supplant hours of grueling labor in the classroom and workplace. European countries trying this see the opposite effect: fewer women in senior business roles as the increased labor regulations discouraged hiring and promoting women. Their pink kitten ears may be cute, but these strikers are anything but liberated.

Carrie Sheffield is a senior contributor for Opportunity Lives. You can follow her on Twitter @carriesheffield and on Facebook.