Here’s How The Male-Female Wage Gap Works

In a video for PragerU, resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, Christina Sommers presents data that shows the male-female wage gap is smaller than many realize.

She introduces points including:

  • “If, for the same work, women make only 77 cents for every dollar a man makes, why don’t businesses hire only women?”
  • “The 77-cents-on-the-dollar statistic is calculated by dividing the median earnings of all women working full-time by the median earnings of all men working full-time. In other words, if the average income of all men is, say, 40,000 dollars a year, and the average annual income of all women is, say, 30,800 dollars, that would mean that women earn 77 cents for every dollar a man earns. 30,800 divided by 40,000 equals .77. But these calculations don’t reveal a gender wage injustice because it doesn’t take into account occupation, position, education or hours worked per week. Even a study by the American Association of University Women, a feminist organization, shows that the actual wage gap shrinks to only 6.6 cents when you factor in different choices men and women make.”
  • “In 2009, the U.S. Department of Labor released a paper that examined more than 50 peer-reviewed studies and concluded that the oft-cited 23 percent wage gap ‘may be almost entirely the result of individual choices being made by both male and female workers.'”

Watch the whole video above.